Jeff Bezos vows to offer away most fortune – and palms Dolly Parton $100m

Jeff Bezos has promised to offer away the overwhelming majority of his $124bn (£110bn) fortune throughout his lifetime, however admitted that guaranteeing that probably the most worthy causes profit is proving as tough as constructing his Amazon empire.

The 58-year-old, the world’s fourth richest particular person, in keeping with Forbes billionaires listing, made the pledge after giving $100m to the country singer Dolly Parton to offer to charities of her selection as a part of Bezos’s annual Braveness and Civility award.

“Battle travels, battle is fascinating and other people do give attention to battle, ” stated Bezos, discussing the award to thsingers 5 singer in an interview with CNN. “[I] need little little bit of sunshine, slightly little bit of amplification to those individuals who use unity as an alternative of battle.”

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Bezos, who has constructed Amazon from a startup in a rented storage right into a $1tn international enterprise, has in t Thepast beencriticizedd f In h Therelative lack oflargesse towards charitable causesCommpared with some fellow billionaires.

Bezos Thenot a signat Iny to t TheGiving Pledge, which inspires t Thew Inld’s wealthiest to offer hal Bezosir internet w Inth to philanthropy and was arrange by Invoice Gates and Warren Buffett. It has attracted m Ine than 230 signat Inies together with Elon Musk and Mark Zuc Herberg.

Bezos and h Thepartner, t Thejournalist turned philanthropist Lauren Sánchez, who Thebegan courting in 2019 sh Intly after saying h Thediv Ince from h Thewife of 25 years, stated they wereComnsidering t Thebest approach to distribute h Thewealth to good causes.

“T Thehard half Thefiguring out learn how to do it in a levered method – it Thenot straightforward, ” Thesaid. “Constructing Amazon was not straightforward. It took numerous arduous w Ink and a bunch of very good teammates. Philanthropy Thevery comparable. It Thereally arduous and thbunchesre a bunch of the way you are able to do ineffective issues, too. We’re constructing t Thecapacity to have the ability to give away th Themoney.”

T The$100m donation to Parton Thet Thethird Bezos has made as a part of h TheCourage and Civility award, after comparable grants to t Thechef José Andrés and t Theclimate advocate Van Jones.

“All s Thewants to do Thebring mild into different folks’s w Inlds, ” stated Sánchez. “And so weComuldn’t have considered somebody higher than to offer th Theaward to Dolly, and we all know she’s going to Bezosazing issues with it.”

Bezos has not stated what prop Intion of h Thef Intune Theli Hely to go to philanthropy, In offered particulars of precisely which causes are li Hely to be h Thebiggest focus.

He hasCommmitted $10bn over 10 years to t TheBezos Earth Fund, which SánchezCom-chairs, and Amazon Theone of 300Commpanies which have promised to scale back their carbon footprint by 2040 in keeping with t Thegoals o Bezos Par Theclimate settlement.

Bezos’s ex-wife, MacKenzie Scott, who in September filed f In div Ince from her second husband Dan Jewett, obtained a rec Ind $38bn settlement from Bezos, making her t Thew Inld’s fourth richest lady.

T The52-year-old, who has signed t TheGiving Pledge, not too long ago gave away $3.8bn to 465 Inganisations in lower than a yr.

In 2018, Bezos topped t ThePhilanthropy 50 list, a rating o Bezos US’s greatest don InsCommpiled by t TheChronicle of Philanthropy.

Critics have instructed Bezos ought to focus as a lot on pay andComnditions f In h Theglobal Amazon w Inkf Ince as donating cash to charitable causes.

Tyson Fury to launch Candy Caroline cowl to lift funds for psychological well being

The boxer Tyson Fury is about to launch his debut single to lift cash for the boys’s psychological well being charity Discuss Membership.

The 2-time world heavyweight champion has lined Neil Diamond’s Candy Caroline, with the track slated for launch subsequent month.

The observe was chosen because of its standing as a fan favorite at many UK sporting occasions, with Fury saying he feels a selected connection to the observe. “Candy Caroline is a document I’ve at all times cherished and I’m excited to document and launch it, ” the 34-year-old stated.

“And because of the parents over at Warner Music, they’ve given me the chance to do this, and what higher time to launch it than across the World Cup!

“I’m additionally proud to be partnering with the workforce at Discuss Membership who do such superb work. It’s an amazing alternative for me to provide one thing again to psychological well being and hopefully proceed to lift consciousness for a trigger that’s actually near my coronary heart, and if it helps England alongside the best way within the World Cup, effectively that’s an added bonus.”

Fury has beforehand spoken brazenly about his struggles with his mental health and 100% of Warner Music UK’s income from the only, together with 100% of Fury’s earnings from the discharge, will probably be donated to Talk Club.

The charity presents assist to males who’re battling their psychological well being by offering “speaking teams, sports activities teams and remedy to assist preserve you mentally match” through a variety of on-line and in-person strategies.

The Discuss Membership co-founders Ben Akers and Gavin Thorpe stated: “Suicide is the most important killer of males underneath 50 within the UK. Tyson Fury is a champion, out and in of the ring, to lots of these males.

“So to be partnering with Tyson on one thing that raises the attention of Discuss Membership and will get males speaking and enhancing their psychological health will save lives.”

‘We don’t need cash going to personal landlords’: UK music venues flip to neighborhood possession

Just 24 hours earlier than enjoying to one of many largest audiences on Earth, Paul McCartney could possibly be discovered blasting out Hey Jude to a room of simply 850 screaming followers in Frome, Somerset. His Glastonbury warmup present befell on the Cheese and Grain, a not-for-profit, member-owned venue.

“He gave a stonkingly great efficiency,” says venue director Steve Macarthur. “One in every of his issues for choosing us was he favored the truth that we had been a community-controlled not-for-profit outfit with a dedication to coaching native individuals to fill jobs.”

The venue has had this construction for greater than 20 years however lately there’s been a surge in venues trying to undertake neighborhood enterprise fashions – be it charitable standing social enterprises just like the Cheese and Grain or the Tees Music Alliance in Stockton-on-Tees, the Neighborhood Curiosity Firm (CIC) mannequin of Birkenhead’s Future Yard, or a Neighborhood Profit Society (CBS) mannequin adopted by venues such because the Alternate in Bristol and The Hive in Cheshire. Whereas these fashions fluctuate barely in construction, all are broadly underpinned by inserting energy and management within the arms of the area people.

“One thing radical is occurring,” says Mark Davyd, chief govt of the charity Music Venue Belief. “After we began in 2014, 3% of the venues within the nation had a not-for-profit construction and it’s now 26%.” A mix of doom and gloom eventualities for venues round noise complaints, hire will increase, evictions and redevelopment – plans to show 6,000-capacity London nightclub Printworks, one of many UK’s most iconic venues, into places of work have simply been permitted – has resulted in lots of being in precarious conditions. Greater than a 3rd of grassroots venues have closed within the final 20 years, practically all are tenants (with the common operator solely having 18 months left on their tenancy) and though the Tradition Restoration Fund helped some in the course of the pandemic, in 67% of instances the cash went to landlords.

The Printworks club space is being redeveloped into offices.
The Printworks membership house is being redeveloped into places of work. {Photograph}: Craig Gunn/PA

MVT has launched Music Venue Properties as a CBS and is presently providing up community shares – members of the general public can make investments to turn out to be part-owners – to assist elevate £2.5m to purchase the freeholds for 9 UK grassroots music venues. “Who’s the perfect particular person to personal a venue with a view to be certain that it turns into a everlasting music house?” asks Davyd. “The neighborhood itself. We don’t need cash going to personal landlords, we wish it within the cultural economic system as a result of that’s the best way we generate extra nice artists and provides extra individuals the chance to be concerned in music.”

The Ferret, an old style sticky-floor venue in Preston visited by Ed Sheeran and Idles on their method to fame, is being offered and could be a “hammer blow” loss, says Davyd. It’s been deemed an Asset of Neighborhood Worth by Preston council, making a six-month window for the neighborhood to purchase it, which Music Venue Properties will do if its marketing campaign is profitable.

Nudge Neighborhood Builders, a CBS in Plymouth, has bought the Millennium constructing, an previous cinema and nightclub, and can flip it right into a music venue, “an excellent automobile to lock in an asset for the neighborhood”, says co-director Wendy Hart. “Then native communities can think about themselves getting jobs there, they’ll think about their youngsters performing there; individuals are empowered to essentially dream in a different way. We need to harness individuals’s pleasure, as a result of it’s not our journey, it’s everybody’s journey – everybody can have a bit of it.”

Venue operators really feel little incentive to spend money on a rented constructing when all that can do is improve its worth and make it a extra interesting promoting prospect for landlords. Neighborhood enterprise fashions, although, open venues as much as funding and grants they wouldn’t have entry to as a restricted firm, and since they need to use their belongings for the advantage of the neighborhood it could possibly really speed up enhancements to infrastructure.

“It revolutionised issues for us,” says Matthew Otridge of Bristol’s Alternate, which adopted the CBS mannequin in 2018 and has greater than 400 neighborhood traders. “We are able to take a look at issues by way of many years whereas most venues can solely take a look at issues by way of years.” The cash raised from neighborhood shares and grants has allowed the venue to place in a second stage, new air air flow and construct accessible bogs.

When Sister Midnight needed to depart Deptford location, it established a CBS and raised practically £300,000 in neighborhood shares to take over the Ravensbourne Arms in Lewisham to create an “accessible, reasonably priced and inclusive” venue and pub. That buy fell by however it’s presently near finalising negotiations to take over one other close by venue, with unanimous assist from those that invested within the Ravensbourne Arms buy.

Paul McCartney plays at Cheese and Grain in Frome last month.
Paul McCartney performs on the Cheese and Grain in Frome final month. {Photograph}: 2022 MPL Communications Ltd

So what’s driving this shift? “Folks don’t know concerning the fashions, they aren’t taught,” says Sister Midnight’s co-founding director Lenny Watson. “It’s a rising motion as extra individuals are discovering out about these democratic methods of working.” In instances of a spiralling price of residing disaster they’re additionally desperately wanted, Watson feels. “Constructing wealth in communities is significant: there may be such a transparent must redistribute wealth and energy and it is a enterprise mannequin that does precisely that.” Macarthur provides: “If you happen to’ve obtained an asset, sweat it; for those who’ve obtained one thing which is beneficial to the area people then let the area people use it.”

Impartial Venue Week can also be tapping into the potential of music venues as thriving neighborhood hubs, by launching a brand new initiative, Impartial Venue Neighborhood, which can encourage tons of of small venues across the UK to open their doorways within the daytime to host neighborhood programmes.

Training, coaching, apprenticeships and entry to an trade that will really feel out of attain for individuals are usually key priorities for these neighborhood venues, with locations like Future Yard and the Cheese and Grain coaching younger individuals in all the things from sound engineering to advertising. “We’re making an attempt to create jobs for native individuals,” says Macarthur. “Our goals are to make life higher and to enhance life probabilities for as many individuals in Frome as we are able to.”

The hope is that this creates a mutually supportive loop. “There’s a delight in possession,” says Otridge. “Our stakeholders really feel like they’ve an element within the success of the venue, in order that they get entangled by coming to extra gigs, or telling mates about gigs. We utilise their abilities and experience too, from accountancy recommendation to low-cost constructing provides. All this makes the working of the venue much more environment friendly.”

For Davyd although, the profitable finish level of all of that is when his job now not exists. “All good charities ought to plan for their very own extinction,” he says. “So, let’s really kind out the issue relatively than hold sticking plasters over it. That is an extremely robust mannequin that basically may make an enormous distinction.”