Ukrainian Eurovision winners Kalush Orchestra to carry out first UK live performance at Glastonbury

Kalush Orchestra, the Ukrainian group who triumphed on the 2022 Eurovision music contest, are to carry out at Glastonbury festival for his or her first ever UK live performance.

Their profitable music Stefania blended hip-hop with the intricate flutes and heartfelt vocals of their nationwide people music, and noticed an enormous response from the general public, who swept them to victory within the Eurovision cellphone voting – a transparent demonstration of solidarity with Ukraine in the course of the battle with Russia.

The sextet will seem on the Fact stage on Friday evening (technically early Saturday morning, at 1.10am), within the pageant’s fantastical, extremely politicised Shangri-La space.

Frontman Oleh Psiuk mentioned: “That is the right place for our first ever British efficiency and we hope it will likely be the beginning of many within the UK. We’re very grateful for all of the help we obtain from the folks of Britain, each for us and our nation, and we’re getting ready a really particular Ukrainian shock for the followers at Glastonbury. What’s it? You’ll quickly see.”

Chris “Tofu” Macmeikan, director of Shangri-La, mentioned it was a privilege to welcome the group, including: “We’re honoured to have the possibility to point out our solidarity with Ukraine. On the Fact stage we have now at all times championed Roma and Jap European music, remixed for the twenty first century, so they’re the right match.”

Glastonbury welcomes one other Ukrainian Eurovision act, 2021 entrants Go_A who got here in fifth place (and have been voted second within the public vote). The 2 teams share a band member, Ihor Didenchuk, and, like Kalush Orchestra, Go_A mix conventional Ukrainian songwriting with up to date influences, leading to an astonishing high-tempo fusion of people and techno on their Eurovision entry music Shum. They carry out on the John Peel stage at 11.30am on Saturday.

Showing on the Pyramid stage at 12.45, simply earlier than Herbie Hancock, is the Ukrainian group DakhaBrakha. Identified for his or her putting stage outfits, and that includes three singers who studied as ethnomusicologists, the quartet use a globe-spanning number of devices to make stirring people songs.

At midday on Friday, a chat occasion on the Left Discipline stage, co-curated by Billy Bragg, will categorical solidarity with the folks of Ukraine, with panellists together with Ukrainian activists alongside the Guardian journalists Emma Graham-Harrison and John Harris, plus others.

Kalush Orchestra expressed their disappointment this week on the proposal by Eurovision organisers that the 2023 contest – which usually would have been hosted within the profitable nation of Ukraine – will happen within the UK, as a result of safety causes.

“Our staff may be very disenchanted with the EBU’s choice and has excessive hopes that it’s potential to vary it,” Psiuk mentioned. “We actually need to maintain this Eurovision music contest in Ukraine and our armed forces will do every little thing potential to make it protected for everybody. Simply give us slightly time and we’ll show to you that every little thing might be correctly.”

‘A totally completely different language’: how Ukrainian writers and artists are responding to the battle

‘Okyiv is being bombed,” the message started, “and I’m undecided I’ll get one other probability to do that. So right here is almost all of my 2010-19 music that you’ll have by no means heard.” After which it ended with the phrases: “Dying to Putin.” I learn this on Bandcamp, on 25 February, the day after Russian tanks rolled into Ukraine. It was written by Timur Dzhafarov, higher often called John Object, a maker of deconstructed membership music. On that day, he gathered many of the music he has created since he began recording on the age of 15, put it into one huge anthology, and printed the lot below the title Life. Not lengthy after, he was drafted into the Ukrainian military.

I realized about this assortment from his Instagram account, which additionally carries Dzhafarov’s “battle diaries”. He is likely one of the many Ukrainian artists from whom I’ve realized, amongst different ugly issues, what a battlefield seems like. Their experiences are completely different from statistics and mainstream media feeds: they’re very private, direct, poignant.

Timur Dzhafarov AKA John Object.
‘My outdated good friend invited me to have “the final peacetime beer”. And he was proper.’ … Timur Dzhafarov, AKA John Object

“This battle, in some form or type, has been occurring within the east of Ukraine for the previous eight years,” says Dzhafarov on Instagram. “We had been all conscious of it, a delicate hum of hysteria continually there. However my mates who had been there moved away, and all of us realized to stay with it. All of us learn the information early this 12 months. All of us noticed the tanks, the troopers on the border. All of us knew it was coming, however hoped it wasn’t. On 23 February, my outdated good friend invited me to have ‘the final peacetime beer’. And he was proper. The subsequent morning, nonetheless awake at 5am, I heard distant explosions in Kyiv.”

The music neighborhood in Ukraine has been utilizing each channel doable to publicise what is going on on the frontline, from airing images of bombings to suggesting locations to donate or switch cash. “For the final 20 days earlier than 24 February,” says Dzhafarov, “I used to be writing songs in Ukrainian, which I’d by no means efficiently completed earlier than, a few wasted life and a want to stay. I used to be addressing them to Russian troopers and Putin himself.”

Dzhafarov has simply turned 27 and his new album was due out final month, however he discovered himself on the entrance, and the bottom the place he was stationed was bombed. “I used to be, and I might be, a musician in free Ukraine – and proper now I’m a soldier in wartime Ukraine. That’s my job and I have to pay attention to it always.”

Many Ukrainian visible artists are additionally utilizing their abilities to file the truth that their worlds have turned the wrong way up. Zhenya Oliinyk creates intimate, private photographs enlivened with easy handwritten phrases. “The battle has been occurring since 2014,” she tells me through Instagram. “However on 24 February, it hit with full power.” Oliinyk and her boyfriend taped up their home windows, to catch shards in case of shelling, and hid of their basement, where she put together a comic strip for the New Yorker.

Zhenya Oliinyk.
‘Sharing data is profoundly essential now’ … Zhenya Oliinyk. {Photograph}: Jeki/Zhenia Perutska

In a single field, a girl sits towards a wall close to a window, her anxious texts and replies showing in speech bubbles: “The place are you? How are you? I’m alive. You good? Hey there. Keep protected. Name me.” The pair determined to go away for Lviv, however discovered it too crowded, so went again – first to a village close to Kyiv and later to the capital. “I proceed to attract,” says Oliinyk. “And in some way we obtained used to the sound of explosions – even our canine did.”

Oliinyk, a 12 months youthful than Dzhafarov, was planning for instance a youngsters’s detective guide for a Ukrainian writer in March. She was additionally alleged to open her first private exhibition in Kyiv. However ever since she discovered herself on the frontline of battle, she has completely different priorities. “Sharing data is profoundly essential now,” she says, “particularly with Russian propaganda and western colonial optics on Ukrainian historical past.”

Serhiy Zhadan, some of the common modern Ukrainian writers, is utilizing social media to chronicle the battle. The 47-year-old, who made his debut within the Nineteen Nineties, can be the singer with Zhadan and the Canines. He has been near the entrance for a very long time, having lived in Kharkiv since 2014, proper subsequent to the so-called Donetsk individuals’s republic and Luhansk individuals’s republic.

Zhadan and his mates used to go to Donbas on volunteer expeditions. They performed concert events and helped civilians, which is how his 2017 guide The Orphanage happened. Though the phrase Donbas is rarely talked about, it’s clear that we’re within the midst of the battle unleashed in jap Ukraine after the fall of president Viktor Yanukovych in 2014. Its protagonist, a instructor known as Pasha in his 30s, has to convey house his nephew, who’s at risk. His journey descends into hell, with descriptions of battle which might be as terrifying as any information report.

‘There have been voices saying that it is not worth writing about the war until it is over’ … Serhiy Zhadan last year in Kyiv during a concert for the 30th anniversary of Ukrainian independence.
‘There have been voices saying that it isn’t price writing concerning the battle till it’s over’ … Serhiy Zhadan final 12 months in Kyiv throughout a live performance for the thirtieth anniversary of Ukrainian independence. {Photograph}: Ukrinform/Rex/Shutterstock

“In Ukraine, there have been voices saying that it isn’t price writing concerning the battle till it’s over,” Zhadan wrote in a Polish newspaper in 2019 as his guide was printed there. Zhadan urged readers to forego the politics of the battle and as an alternative put themselves within the sneakers of “a person who’s working by means of a darkish metropolis below chaotic hearth. A person who is consistently bending down and searching over his shoulder, whose eyes are infected from the shortage of sleep and from the chilly.”

Zhadan is now giving a first-hand report on the battle via his Facebook page. He information his travels round Kharkiv, serving to ladies and kids escape gunfire and shelling, interesting for help for hospitals, and photographing medicines arriving. He posts footage of a neighborhood centre known as The Phrase, which was destroyed, in addition to pictures of Outdated Hem, a preferred pub he used to carry out in together with his band. Within the autumn of 2014, Outdated Hem doubled because the HQ of the Euromaidan rebellion. It was decreased to rubble final month.

“A lot might be written and sung about this battle,” famous Zhadan in a single put up. “I suppose it will likely be a very completely different language. A language that’s being shaped right this moment, each day, everywhere in the nation.” Shortly after, he printed the lyrics to Youngsters, a tune by Zhadan and Canines that was recorded in Dnipro, jap Ukraine, because the battle raged round them. “Since evening the sky stays darkish / There’s a battle, youngsters are rising up / And you’re keen on them, as a result of apart from you / nobody will love them right here.” I listened to it on the day the theatre in Mariupol – a spot of refuge for households with youngsters – was bombed.

One other voice is that of Oksana Zabuzhko. For few years, her essays have been predicting what’s now taking place. I noticed her talking stay on 15 March on the Gdańsk Shakespeare Theatre in northern Poland, the place I stay. The Ukrainian author had come to my nation to advertise a set of her writings known as Planet Wormwood. The occasion was scheduled for 23 February and he or she was supposed to remain for 3 days, however the author has have travelled round Europe for 3 weeks. Though far-off from Kyiv, she feels as if she continues to be very a lot on the entrance line, telling her viewers in Gdańsk: “The annexation of Crimea ought to have been taken severely as a result of it was a violation of worldwide regulation. It was a sign that we had been going again to the caves, the place solely the regulation of power and violence works. However no person listened to me then.”

In Could 2014, she made a speech in Berlin. When she in contrast Putin to Hitler, her microphone was rapidly turned off. This 12 months, on 8 March, she spoke at a plenary session of the European parliament in Strasbourg, the primary time an individual who’s neither an EU citizen nor an official has completed so. She repeated her comparability – and this time was applauded.

“Many lives might have been saved,” she mentioned, “if the EU and the US had woken up eight years in the past when Putin invaded Crimea. The brand new Hitler was prepared to select up the place the earlier one left off. As a author who is aware of a factor or two about language, I need to inform you that that is already a battle, not only a native battle. Belief Putin when he talks about his ambitions.”

Phrases, drawings, music – they’ll all inform us about this battle. As a former journalist, Oliinyk finds drawing similar to her earlier career. “We inform tales in some ways,” she says. “Ukrainian voices need to be listened to now. And the identical might be true after Russian troops depart our nation. Sadly, Russia will nonetheless be our neighbour. There’ll nonetheless be individuals with traumatic experiences. There might be new Ukrainian communities in lots of nations. There might be years of rebuilding our cities. We’ll have to speak about all of it – and we’ll achieve this by means of artwork.”

Her phrases echo these of Zhadan, who ends virtually all his entries on Fb with the sentence: “Tomorrow we are going to get up someday nearer to our victory.” Dzhafarov, in the meantime, has this to say about his subsequent album: “No matter I file might be joyful. A provisional title proper now’s How We Received the Conflict.”